abisola

09 Jun 2008 568 views
 
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photoblog image Any advice is appreciated

Any advice is appreciated

Ok guys, please help me out here. What could I have done different in my composition?

Basically, when I saw this bench I thought: 'hmm... this looks like a spot a lonely person could sit on'. In conjunction with the long road into the distance, I felt it would portray a sense of loneliness or lonesomeness... but  now, I've taken the shot. I look at it and it doesn't seem that way to me.

So here's my question: how could I have done this different?

Any advice is appreciated

Ok guys, please help me out here. What could I have done different in my composition?

Basically, when I saw this bench I thought: 'hmm... this looks like a spot a lonely person could sit on'. In conjunction with the long road into the distance, I felt it would portray a sense of loneliness or lonesomeness... but  now, I've taken the shot. I look at it and it doesn't seem that way to me.

So here's my question: how could I have done this different?

comments (6)

You know I think the composition is good as it is. But I can't help but wished you'd waited till some passerby was approaching the bench at the top of the path.
Abisola Fatokun: Hey, thanks Jide! Twas nice hanging out with you today :p
hmmmmm.... I agree with jide, can think of anything else at the mo
  • Martin
  • United States
  • 9 Jun 2008, 02:18
Here are a couple things you could try/consider. Hopefully some of it makes a little bit of sense. 1. I think it is hard to capture loneliness with such a busy background. It just doesn't express isolation very well. Can you frame this so you have the bench and the path in the frame, but a less cluttered background? Maybe the hedge? 2. A frame filling bench demands too much attention for your intended message. I think it needs to have some space around it. Loneliness is only possible if the context shows that there aren't any people around or that it is in an isolated location. 3. Putting the lonely person in the frame might make the message clearer. My two cents. I hope this helps in some way.
  • Ginnie
  • back from Hawaii!
  • 9 Jun 2008, 02:28
The only think I might have done differently, Bisola, is have more space in the foreground before the bench, but I don't know if it would add more sense of loneliness? I DO like that it in B&W!
I think a lonely person in the far distance and cropping out the distractions as Martin suggested would work

However I think also increasing the shadows in thus creating a dark gloomy feeling might be another approach.

richard
  • david
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 23 Aug 2008, 12:03
Photographs are very simple. To express loneliness you need something simple like a person in a vast expanse of nothing.

There are too many things here to express loneliness. Photographs need simple expressions to make themselves understood.

So, forgetting the loneliness angle, I think you have to ask yourself, where does your eye lead you? And is that spot interesting?

The way I look at it, the bench and the path are props that lead me to the thing that is interesting.

The shot leads me towards that round window at the end of the path. It's lighter in colour than its surroundings and it's kind of hovering and it's not immediately obvious what it is, so it commanded my attention.

There are many things that would interest me, but this isn't really a point of interest for me.

I guess I would recommend that you imagine what you would find interesting to see at the end of the path and shoot things that grab you at that level.

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